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Lisa Reyes, Human Resources, Solano County Office of Education

Nominees Sought For ‘Operation Recognition’ In Solano County | Dixon, CA Patch

By Susan C. Schena

The Solano County Office of Education is participating in “Operation Recognition” which honors U.S. veterans and Japanese-American citizens who were unable to continue high school due to wartime circumstances by awarding them with high school diplomas.

In the 1940s, ’50s, ’60s and’ 70s, thousands of young men and women left high school and home to join the U.S. armed forces in World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War. Also during World War II, many Japanese-American citizens were interned in relocation camps across the United States, district officials said.

California Education Code section 51430 authorizes retroactive awarding of high school diplomas to eligible veterans and persons detained in internment camps during World War II — individuals unable to finish high school and receive diplomas.

Source: Nominees Sought For ‘Operation Recognition’ In Solano County | Dixon, CA Patch

Benicia Teachers Association endorses candidates – Times-Herald

The Benicia Teachers Association has finalized its endorsements for Benicia City Council 2018, the Association announced.

The association has endorsed Christina Strawbridge and Lionel Largespada. Two of the five seats on the city council are open during the fall election. Kari Birdseye, and William Emes Jr. are also seeking election the council.

The Association finalized its endorsements for the Benicia Unified School District Board of Education. Those candidates are Adrean Hayashi, Mark Maselli, and Sheri Zada. Three of the five board seats are open. Incumbent Diane Ferrucci is seeking re-election, while challenger Gethsemane Moss is also seeking election to the board.

Source: Benicia Teachers Association endorses candidates – Times-Herald

SCOE supe named among Garamendi’s 2018 Women of the Year – The Reporter

By Richard Bammer

Lisette Estrella-Henderson, superintendent of Solano County schools, will need to make space on her wall or shelf of awards in her Vacaville home.

Rep. John Garamendi, D-Solano, has named the 33-year educator as one of his 2018 Women of the Year, it has been announced.

“There are so many deserving women that I have the privilege to work alongside with each day,” Estrella-Henderson said in a press release Thursday. “For Congressman Garamendi to recognize me as someone who has made a positive difference in our community, I am truly honored!”

She and 45 other women will be recognized Friday during a 9 a.m.-to-noon ceremony in the Community Room at Woodland Community College, 2300 E. Gibson Road, Woodland. Each will receive a congressional proclamation that will be preserved in the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C.

Source: SCOE supe named among Garamendi’s 2018 Women of the Year – The Reporter

Vallejo School Board to elect new vice president – Times-Herald

By Rachel Raskin-Zrihen

The election of a new vice president, in the wake of former president Burky Worel’s resignation, will be among the topics discussed at the regular Governing Board of Education meeting at 6 p.m. today (Wednesday).

Also on tap: Officially recognizing CC and Amber Sabathia for their help to students, as well as another list of recommended contracts between vendors and the Vallejo City Unified School District.

Superintendent Adam Clark will make the case for recognizing CC and Amber Sabathia Day for their PitCCH In Foundation’s ongoing distribution of backpacks and supplies to Vallejo students — most recently 1,800 at Vallejo High School and one to every 1st, 2nd and 3rd grade VCUSD student and to every student at Cooper Elementary School. Since its inception, the PitCCh In Foundation has donated more than 47,000 backpacks to students, saving parents hundreds of dollars.

Source: Vallejo School Board to elect new vice president – Times-Herald

Torlakson Recognizes Suicide Prevention Month – Year 2018 (CA Dept of Education)

State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson marked Suicide Awareness and Prevention Month today by reminding students, teachers, and staff at C.K. McClatchy High School to recognize the risk factors of suicide so they can help identify students who might be in crisis and need assistance.

Students from the C.K. McClatchy National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) on Campus Club and the California Department of Education (CDE) conducted the event to focus on student suicide risks.

“The suicide of a student is a terrible tragedy that devastates a family, a school, and an entire community. We must do everything we can to prevent suicide,” said Torlakson. “Every suicide threat made by a student should be taken seriously.”

Torlakson said peer-to-peer assistance programs, school mental health professionals, and trained school and district staff can reassure and support a student who might be struggling with depression, stress, anxiety, loneliness, or bullying.

A recent study in the Journal of Pediatrics stated that nearly one in five high school students in California experienced suicidal ideation.

Source: Torlakson Recognizes Suicide Prevention Month – Year 2018 (CA Dept of Education)

Garamendi taps Estrella-Henderson as among top women in region – Daily Republic

By Daily Republic Staff

The Solano County Office of Education announced Wednesday that Lisette Estrella-Henderson, Solano County superintendent of schools, has been selected as one of Rep. John Garamendi’s 2018 Women of the Year.

The annual awards publicly honor outstanding women of the 3rd Congressional District improve the quality of life in the district through their work and volunteerism.

“There are so many deserving women that I have the privilege to work alongside with each day. I am humbled and astounded by this tremendous honor,” Estrella-Henderson said in a prepared statement.

Source: Garamendi taps Estrella-Henderson as among top women in region

CTE: Funding & New State Oversight – Public Policy Institute of California

By Rafujio Gonzalez, Courtney Lee

President Donald Trump recently signed the Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act, or Perkins V, which reauthorized $1.2 billion dollars in federal funds for career and technical educational (CTE) programs. The new law gives states more flexibility to set their own goals for CTE programs, along with reporting progress toward those goals. Who might benefit from these changes, and what new challenges do they present to the state?

Perkins V supports programs that integrate career skills and prepare students at the secondary, postsecondary, and adult education level for the workforce—for such careers as IT technician, accountant, or nurse. Funding is based on student enrollment, and each year California receives more than $110 million in Perkins dollars, the vast majority (85%) of which go to CTE programs in high schools and community colleges. During the 2017–18 school year, close to 780,000 (40%) high school students and 420,000 (35%) full-time community college students participated in CTE.

Source: Career Technical Education: Funding & New State Oversight – Public Policy Institute of California

DeVos Reopens Application Process for ESSA’s Innovative Assessment Pilot – Education Week

By Alyson Klein

States: Were you worried you missed the window to apply to the Every Student Succeeds Act’s innovative assessment pilot?

Then, some good news for you: The U.S. Department of Education is inviting more state applications for the testing leeway, which allows states to try out new types of tests in a handful of districts before taking them statewide.

States are being asked to let the department know if they are interested in applying by Oct. 17. Applications are due Dec. 17. More in this notice, published in the Federal Register Monday.

Source: Betsy DeVos Reopens Application Process for ESSA’s Innovative Assessment Pilot – Politics K-12 – Education Week

Bill to start school later close to becoming law – KEYT

By Dave Alley

Older students in California may be able to sleep in a little longer in the future if Governor Brown signs a bill that is now on his desk.

SB 328 would require that all middle and high schools start no earlier than 8:30 a.m. and was recently approved by the both houses of State Legislature.

It was written by Sen. Anthony Portantino (D-La Cañada Flintridge) in an effort to help give students more time to sleep.

Source: Bill to start school later close to becoming law – KEYT

BHS nabs 13 Arty nominees apiece for 2017-18 productions – Benicia Herald

By Nick Sestanovich

The Performing Arts Network (PAN-Arts) announced its nominees for the 34th annual Arty Awards, which honor theatrical productions at all levels in the counties of Solano, Napa and– for the first time this year– Yolo, this morning. Once again, Benicia High School and Benicia Old Town Theatre Group are well-represented among the nominees.

Benicia High School’s fall play, the fantasy/comedy/drama “She Kills Monsters,” racked up a total of 13 nominations, including outstanding high school production. Drama instructor Nathan Day received nods for directing, sound design and set design. Additionally, Brandon Nelson and Meghan Guertin received nods for lighting design, and Linda Wichelman received a nomination for costume design. In the acting categories, Eleanor Bettencourt and Pilar Gonzales are up for best lead actress, Kevin McLarty and Garrett Mingardi are in the running for best lead actor, Tate Reeves received a nod for best supporting actor, and Guertin and Skylear Clouse are competing for best supporting actress.

Source: BHS nabs 13 Arty nominees apiece for 2017-18 productions; BOTTG nets 5

Gregorius and Hicks PitCCh In at Bronx Public School – Pinstriped Prospects

By Austin Petolillo

What started off as a problem for one turned into a solution for thousands.

Every new school year, Margie Sabathia-Lanier would fret over the decision she had to make with regards to her son, CC Sabathia. New clothes? Or new school supplies?

She would ultimately choose the latter but that left CC wearing beat-up sneakers while everyone else flashed their brand new shoes. Sure that may not seem like a big problem, but that’s just one of the many financial issues that a lot of people not as well known as CC has to deal with every year.

So in 2009, CC, his mother, and his wife Amber decided to take advantage of his platform and take matters into their own hands and start the PitCCh In foundation.

Source: Gregorius and Hicks PitCCh In at Bronx Public School – Pinstriped Prospects

SCOE board denies Rocketship charter appeal – The Reporter

By Richard Bammer

Solano County Office of Education leaders voted unanimously Wednesday to deny the appeal of a Vallejo charter school petition at a time of increasingly intensive debate over the role of charter schools in the state.

The 7-0 decision, coming nearly five weeks after a public hearing about the appeal, occurred during a regular trustees meeting in the county schools headquarters on Business Center Drive in Fairfield.

In many ways, the vote to deny the appeal from Marie Issa Gil, whose petition to form Rocketship Vallejo Elementary Charter School also was denied June 20 by Vallejo City Unified trustees, came as no surprise.

At the June school board meeting, VCU administrators described Gil’s document as “deficient in many key respects” and offered “an unsound educational program,” the latter phrase almost always resulting in denial of a charter petition by a school district or its appeal to a county board or the state Board of Education in Sacramento.

Source: Solano County Office of Education board denies Rocketship charter appeal

High School Voter Education Weeks for 2018 – Letters (CA Dept of Education)

As we approach the upcoming November 6 statewide general election, it is important to ensure that our students are learning to become active and engaged participants in our democracy. It is never too early to motivate our students to get involved. That’s why we strongly encourage your school to observe High School Voter Education Weeks on September 17–28 to put our students on the path to a lifetime of civic engagement and voting. With online pre-registration available for sixteen- and seventeen-year-olds, it’s now easier than ever to get students prepared to cast their own ballots. Once pre-registered, they will automatically become active voters on their eighteenth birthday.

California Education Code designates the last two weeks of September as High School Voter Education Weeks and authorizes schools to designate students as “voter outreach coordinators.” With county elections officials as partners, we provide resources to make it easy for schools to participate. Teachers can help eligible students pre-register or register to vote either on a paper form or online. Voter outreach coordinators can lead registration drives and other school activities aimed at civic participation.

Source: High School Voter Education Weeks for 2018 – Letters (CA Dept of Education)

ESSA Funds Can Be Used to Reduce Chronic Absence – Attendance Works

With so many states (36 plus the District of Columbia) now using chronic absenteeism as an accountability metric as part of their plans to implement the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), many might wonder how ESSA funding mechanisms can be used to help improve attendance.

There are several pots of money in ESSA that states can tap, including funds targeted at promoting academic success for disadvantaged students. Other funds can go towards engaging parents and families or improving “school conditions for student learning.”

FutureEd, a think tank at Georgetown University,lays out some of the options in a blog post:

  • Title I provides more than $15 billion to support schools educating low-income students and school improvement efforts. Since low-income students are both more likely to be chronically absent and more likely to suffer academically because of those missed days, improving attendance becomes an important strategy.

Source: ESSA Funds Can Be Used to Reduce Chronic Absence – Attendance Works

Candidate’s forum attracts council, mayoral, school board hopefuls – Daily Republic

By Amy Maginnis-Honey

More than a dozen candidates for local city councils, mayor duties and school board gathered Monday night for a candidates forum hosted by St. Stephen Christian-Methodist-Episcopal Church.

Each was allotted three minutes to introduce themselves, talk about their platform and answer a dedicated question.

City council

Candidates were asked how they would encourage economic development within their own cities.

Source: Candidate’s forum attracts council, mayoral, school board hopefuls

9/11 tribute honors victims, those who continue to serve – The Reporter

By Joel Rosenbaum

Students from both Travis and Scandia elementary schools on Travis Air Force Base walked to remember and pay tribute to those that lost their lives during the 9/11 terrorists attack 17 years ago.

Gathered Tuesday on the lawn next to the base’s Airman and Family Readiness Center, the nearly 1,000 students from kindergarten to sixth grade listened to their classmates sing patriotic songs and recite poems.

Travis Elementary School Principal Brian Howard talked to the students about the significance of the day.

“You walk to show support to victims, survivors and families of the September 11, 2001 attacks,” he said.

Source: 9/11 tribute honors victims, those who continue to serve

SCOE board set for up-or-down vote on charter school – The Reporter

By Richard Bammer

Solano County Office of Education leaders will grant or deny the appeal of a Vallejo charter school petition when the governing board meets tonight in Fairfield.

The trustees’ decision will come nearly five weeks after a public hearing about the appeal from Marie Issa Gil, whose petition to form Rocketship Vallejo Elementary Charter School was denied June 20 by Vallejo City Unified trustees, after district staffers described the petition as “deficient in many key respects.”

SCOE governing board members will have two formal options, according to agenda documents: 1) Obtain the school’s written agreement to the memorandum of understanding and grant the appeal; or 2) Deny it and adopt Resolution No. B18-19-07 in support of the denial.

It is unclear just how the seven-member board will ultimately vote, but the members’ recent history — notably denying some months ago an appeal by leaders at a Vacaville charter school, Heritage Peak — may serve as a guide.

Source: SCOE board set for up-or-down vote on charter school

CA schools would start no earlier than 8:30 a.m. under bill sent to governor – Daily Republic

By Tribune Content Agency

Eileen Gaspar estimates that her high school daughter gets four to five hours of sleep a night.

Her daughter goes to Olympian High in Chula Vista, where school starts at 7:30 a.m., so she’s out the door each morning by 6:45 a.m. But she has cheerleading practice every evening until about 7 p.m., and once she gets home, she has to shower, eat dinner then stay up late doing homework.

“Kids stay up so late now and doing homework, and then they have to wake up early to go to school,” Gaspar said. “They don’t get that eight-hour rest that they really need.”

Lawmakers recently passed a bill that would force schools to start later, which some hope will address this lack-of-sleep problem that Gaspar sees in her daughter.

Source: California middle and high schools would start no earlier than 8:30 a.m. under bill sent to governor

Travis students remember, honor 9/11 with Freedom Walk – Daily Republic

By Bill Hicks

Time heals all wounds. Some deep scars, however, often linger and serve as a reminder of a painful past.

That healing, on the other hand, comes through strength and resilience.

Both qualities were on display Tuesday during the 12th annual Freedom Walk at Travis Air Force Base, which marked the 17th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on the United States.

Source: Travis students remember, honor 9/11 with Freedom Walk

Dollars for Child Care and Preschool in 2018-19 Near Pre-Recession Levels With Boost From One-Time Funding – California Budget & Policy Center

By Kristin Schumacher

For the fifth year in a row, funding for California’s subsidized child care and development system has increased. This system provides critical child care and early learning opportunities for a limited number of children from low- and moderate-income families, but state funding was cut dramatically during and after the Great Recession, while federal funding for subsidized child care remained relatively flat.[1] This meant that fewer children and families received subsidized care than prior to the onset of the Great Recession. However, state policymakers have incrementally reinvested in these programs and services beginning with the 2014-15 state fiscal year, and bipartisan support for subsidized child care at the federal level has resulted in newly available federal funds, as well. Due to these investments, after adjusting for inflation, overall funding for California’s subsidized child care and development system in the 2018-19 fiscal year is $3.887 billion, 15% greater than in 2017-18 ($3.375 billion), and nearly even with funding levels in 2007-08, prior to the onset of the Great Recession (see chart).

Source: Dollars for Child Care and Preschool in 2018-19 Near Pre-Recession Levels With Boost From One-Time Funding – California Budget & Policy Center