Child Care and Development Programs and the 2018-19 May Revision – CA Budget

Putting the Governor’s 2018-19 May Revision in Context

Several key considerations provide the backdrop:

•State revenues for the coming fiscal year are projected to be higher than previously forecast.

•Economic hardship – overall poverty as well as child poverty – remains very high in most parts of the state, even several years after the end of the Great Recession.

•Various key public services and supports continue to operate at diminished levels due to state cuts made during and after the recession

Source: Microsoft PowerPoint – CAPPA May Revise Handout

$1.6M in Measure A, Prop. 39 contracts on VUSD agenda – The Reporter

By Richard Bammer

Vacaville Unified leaders, when they meet tonight, are expected to approve several large Measure A and Proposition 39 contracts totaling more than $1.6 million, plus pass a resolution calling for “full and fair funding of California’s public schools.”

The seven-member governing board will OK, in order, three Measure A contracts, including 1) a $272,000 agreement with Johnson Mechanical to replace the heating, ventilation and air condition systems in the Wood High administration building; 2) a $65,000 contract with American Asphalt & Resurfacing Co. for the seal coating projects at Vacaville High and Jepson Middle School; and 3) a $629,000 agreement with Sunterra Solar Inc. for solar panels atop the newly built E and M buildings at the West Monte Vista Avenue campus.

Source: $1.6M in Measure A, Prop. 39 contracts on VUSD agenda

What Reaching LCFF Full Implementation Means and Why It Matters – California Budget & Policy Center

By Jonathan KaplanThe proposed state budget that Governor Brown released in January calls for a significant increase in support ($2.9 billion) to fully implement California’s main system for funding K-12 education, the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF), in 2018-19. Reaching this milestone would be a notable accomplishment, especially as it would come two years earlier than initially estimated when the Legislature enacted the LCFF in 2013. Achieving this LCFF funding goal was never intended to mean that an adequate level of financial support needed to deliver a quality education for California’s K-12 students had been provided. However, reaching LCFF full implementation does reflect nearly $20 billion of increased funding for the state’s K-12 schools over the past six years.

Moreover, because the LCFF allocates additional funds to school districts based on their number of disadvantaged students — English learners, foster youth, and students from low-income families — increasing funding for the LCFF means more dollars are being provided to improve educational equity. Advancing equity may also be the goal of recent calls — from some state policymakers and others — to boost LCFF funding further, but exactly how such a boost is provided could unintentionally undermine this goal. To understand why, it is necessary to take a closer look at how the LCFF works and what full implementation really means.

Source: What Reaching LCFF Full Implementation Means and Why It Matters – California Budget & Policy Center

Business pilot program up for discussion by SCC board – The Reporter

By Richard Bammer

Several updates — on the 2017-18 budget, a business program pilot and the Solano County Sheriff’s Department — are on the agenda when Solano Community College leaders meet tonight in Fairfield.

Robert V. Diamond, vice president of finance and administration, will update the governing board about the status of the Solano Community College District budget.

However, the agenda neither included any supporting documents about the 2017-18 budget nor any information about revenues, expenses and funding balances projected for the two outlying years. There was no explanation in the agenda documents.

Lucky Lofton, the school’s executive bonds manager, will update trustees about the Measure Q Small, Local, and Diverse Business Program, including the starting of a two-year pilot program. Its purpose is to establish equity, inclusion and outreach guidelines and promote diversity by offering contracts to small businesses and those owned by ethnic minorities, women and disabled veterans in Solano County and the city of Winters. (Measure Q was the $348 million bond passed by Solano County voters in 2012 to upgrade SCC campuses.)

Source: Business pilot program up for discussion by SCC board

School board OKs 2nd interim financial report – Benicia Herald

By Nick Sestanovich

The school board approved Benicia Unified School District’s second interim financial report at Thursday’s school board meeting.

According to Chief Business Official Tim Rahill, BUSD’s revenue for 2017-18 is at $44.4 million. Thirty-seven percent of the revenue comes from the Local Control Funding Formula, 6 percent comes from local and other funds, 5 percent comes from state funds and 2 percent comes from the federal government. Of the LCFF funds, 37 percent is covered by property taxes and 63 percent comes from the state budget.

Source: School board OKs 2nd interim financial report

Vacaville USD leaders OK interim budget report, Santopadre contract – The Reporter

By Richard Bammer

The Vacaville Unified annual budget for the current year has come into greater focus with the second interim report aired Thursday in the Educational Services Center.

Jennifer Stahlheber, the chief business officer, presented the budget report and multiyear projections during a governing board meeting.

By law, California school districts must submit two interim budget reports for the current fiscal year, usually by mid-December and mid-March, to let state Department of Education officials know that they can pay their bills.

Stahlheber told trustees that the projected budget for the current academic year is some $120 million for a district with 12,600 students, nearly $2 million more than the first interim budget report. Expenses will outpace revenues by $7 million, leading to deficit spending. The ending fund balance is projected to be $16.5 million, the beginning fund balance $23.6 million, with mandatory prudent reserves of $3.6 million for economic uncertainties.

Source: Vacaville Unified School District leaders OK interim budget report, Santopadre contract

Second draft of BUSD financial report up for review – Benicia Herald

By Nick Sestanovich

Tim Rahill, Benicia Unified School District’s chief business official, will be presenting the second interim financial report at Thursday’s school board meeting. The report shows, among other things, that BUSD is operating at a $1.9 million deficit.

At the Dec. 14 school board meeting, Rahill presented the first interim financial report which was approved by the board later that evening, although Trustee Peter Morgan voted against it and suggested the district take a serious look at the budget. After Gov. Jerry Brown unveiled his final budget proposal in January, Rahill said BUSD would need to make $800,000 in continuing adjustments for the budget to become balanced.

The operating deficit of $1.9 million outlined in the second interim financial report is slightly higher than the $1.8 million figure in the first report. Rahill said the 2017-18 deficit includes one-time spending funds of $900,000 and a $1 million operating loss for general ongoing operations. It does not include costs for negotiations with the district employee groups.

Source: Second draft of BUSD financial report up for review

Solano County Office of Education leader to mull over interim budget – Times Herald

By Richard Bammer

Solano County Office of Education leaders likely will approve the 2017-18 second interim budget report when they meet tonight in Fairfield.

By law, California school districts must issue two annual budget reports for their current fiscal year, usually by mid-December and mid-March, to let state officials know that they can pay their bills.

In her overview, Becky Lentz, director of internal business services, will tell the seven-member governing board that Gov. Jerry Brown continues to predict a recession “but the timing is unknown.”

Additionally, cuts to federal programs are expected and so are changes to the Affordable Care Act, passed in 2010 during the Obama administration and intended to constrain healthcare costs. SCOE, which administers community and court schools and some special education programs, among others, is experiencing declining enrollment in its Alternative Education program, Lentz will add.

Source: Solano County Office of Education leader to mull over interim budget

Fairfield-Suisun USD leaders review budget, bargaining agreements – The Reporter

By Richard Bammer

The second interim 2017-18 budget report, and two public hearings about collective bargaining agreements with two employee unions for the 2018-19 academic year are on the agenda when Fairfield-Suisun Unified leaders meet tonight in Fairfield.

California school districts twice yearly are required to certify their ability to pay their bills for the remainder of the fiscal year, which ends June 30. Interim budget reports are the way they do it, official documents due by mid-December and mid-March at the latest.

Michelle Henson, assistant superintendent of business services, will tell the seven-member governing board that the district, the county’s largest with some 21,500 students across some 30 campuses, can meet its financial obligations this year.

She will note cost-of-living adjustments of 1.56 percent for the current year, 2.51 percent in 2018-19, and 2.41 percent in 2019-20.

Source: Fairfield-Suisun Unified School District leaders review budget, bargaining agreements

Trump Seeks to Cut Education Budget by 5 Percent – Education Week

By Andrew Ujifusa

President Donald Trump is seeking a roughly 5 percent cut to the U.S. Department of Education’s budget for fiscal 2019 in a proposal that also mirrors his spending plan from last year by seeking to eliminate a major teacher-focused grant and to expand school choice.

Trump’s proposed budget, released Monday, would provide the Education Department with $63.2 billion in discretionary aid, a $3.6 billion cut—or 5.3 percent— from current spending levels, for the budget year starting Oct. 1. That’s actually less of a cut than what the president sought for fiscal 2018, when he proposed slashing $9.2 billion—or 13.5 percent—from the department.

In order to achieve those proposed spending cuts, the president copied two major education cuts he proposed last year: the elimination of Title II teacher grants and the 21st Century Community Learning Centers. Those two cuts combined would come to about $3.1 billion from current levels. Overall, 39 discretionary programs would be cut, eliminated, or “streamlined.”

Source: Trump Seeks to Cut Education Budget by 5 Percent, Expand School Choice Push – Politics K-12 – Education Week

Fairfield-Suisun USD to discuss 2018-19 budget priorities – The Reporter

By Richard Bammer

A discussion of 2018-19 budget priorities will be among the more significant items of an otherwise relatively light agenda when Fairfield-Suisun Unified leaders meet tonight in Fairfield.

Michelle Henson, assistant superintendent of business services, will lead the discussion, which will be based on Gov. Jerry Brown’s $190 billion 2018-19 state budget proposal, released in January and due for revision in May.

Her presentation, casting an eye on the impact of the state’s numbers on the district’s, will come two weeks after she led a budget presentation at the trustees’ Jan. 25 meeting.

Specifically, Henson will note that projected average daily attendance (ADA) funding for the coming year will be about $9,450 for each of the district’s estimated 20,550 students, yielding some $194 million in state funding under Brown’s landmark Local Control Funding Formula. Additionally, she will tell the seven-member governing board, one-time discretionary funds from the current year will account for some $6 million in additional funds spent on students.

Source: Fairfield-Suisun Unified School District to discuss 2018-19 budget priorities

BUSD business chief: $800K needed for balanced budget – Benicia Herald

By Nick Sestanovich

Benicia Unified School District would need to make $800,000 in ongoing adjustments for its budget to break even, Chief Business Official Tim Rahill reported at Thursday’s school board meeting.

On Jan. 10, Gov. Jerry Brown announced his final January budget proposal. After gathering information from the proposal, Rahill said BUSD would need to make $800,000 in continuing budget adjustments for the budget to become balanced and provide for California’s required minimum 3 percent reserve for economic uncertainties— which is currently $1.4 million— and the board policy reserve— which stands at $2 million.

“Both of those reserves are enacted to help provide financial stability for the district in tough economic times, such as continuing declining student enrollment which our district has experienced for at least two years in a row,” Rahill said.Reserves can also provide security in times of state or national recessions or economic slowdowns, Rahill said.

The chief business official said BUSD would receive an estimated $1.3 million in one-time funds, which would be spent on items like books, technology, 21st-century classrooms and professional development, including the instructional coaching model. The money would not be spent on items that have a cost to the district over multiple years.

Source: BUSD business chief: $800K needed for balanced budget

Vallejo trustees slash $4.3 million from budget – Times Herald

By John Glidden

A morose Vallejo school board unanimously approved devastating budget cuts Tuesday night as 50 district positions were eliminated.

The move will save the Vallejo City Unified School District about $4.3 million for its upcoming 2018-19 fiscal year budget.

A sizable audience was on hand to learn about the cuts during the special board meeting held at Steffan Manor Elementary School.

“Every position in the district is directed toward supporting the classroom, so none of these reductions, that we are recommending, are easy to make,” VCUSD Superintendent Adam Clark said to the board and those in attendance. “They all are useful, they all are needed within our district to support our students. Every last one of them.”

Source: Vallejo trustees slash $4.3 million from budget

Vallejo trustees get first look at budget cuts – Times Herald

By John Glidden

Possible teacher layoffs dominated the conversation Wednesday night, as the Vallejo school board discussed cutting $8.9 million from the district’s 2018-19 budget.

“I don’t want to cut anything in the classroom and I’m going to be watching that carefully,” said Trustee Tony Ublade as preliminary reductions being proposed by the district include cutting about 32 teaching positions. This amounts to $2.6 million in savings, district staff said.

Vallejo Education Association President Sheila Gradwohl said the unpredictably of teacher layoffs affects everyone.

“The feeling you get when this happens is one of uncertainty, you’re scared, you don’t know if you can pay bills, it really affects you and if it affects you, it affects your kids, affects the students you teach,” Gradwohl said.

Source: Vallejo trustees get first look at budget cuts

Fairfield-Suisun trustees support more money for California schools – Daily Republic

By Ryan McCarthy

State spending on public schools doesn’t match California’s wealth, ambitions, demographics or demands of a 21st century education, says a resolution that Fairfield-Suisun School District trustees approved Thursday.

“This is so very necessary,” said David Isom, the board of trustees president.

The resolution states that “Despite its vast wealth, California has consistently underfunded public education while widening its scope, adding new requirements and raising standards without providing appropriate resources to prepare all students for college, career and civil life.”

Source: Fairfield-Suisun trustees support more money for California schools

School board group says up to $40B more needed annually – Daily Republic

By Ryan McCarthy

State spending on public schools doesn’t match California’s wealth, ambitions, demographics or demands of a 21st century education, says a resolution that goes before Fairfield-Suisun School District trustees Thursday.

“Despite its vast wealth, California has consistently underfunded public education while widening its scope, adding new requirements and raising standards without providing appropriate resources to prepare all students for college, career and civil life,” according to the resolution.

Kris Corey, superintendent of the Fairfield-Suisun School District, said in a report to trustees that “California has the world’s sixth-largest economy and the highest gross domestic product of any state.”

Source: School board group says up to $40B more needed annually for quality education

Vallejo school board to review budget reductions – Times Herald

By John Glidden

The Vallejo school board will get its first look on Wednesday at proposed reductions which will slash about $8.9 million from the district’s 2018-19 budget.

Numerous staffing cuts, including teachers, site safety supervisors, and administrators are part of the reductions.

Taking the biggest administrative hit is the district’s Partnerships & Community Engagement Division. Cuts include elimination of the division’s top two positions.

Alana Shackelford has served as chief partnerships and community engagement officer since being promoted to the position in the summer of 2015 by former Superintendent Ramona Bishop.

Last week, the school board approved moving Kathleen Gossett to principal of Johnston Cooper Elementary School. Gossett was tapped to be director of partnership & community engagement after Shackelford’s promotion three years ago.

Source: Vallejo school board to review budget reductions

Budget Proposal Prioritizes Savings Amid  Uncertainties – California Budget & Policy Center

On January 10, Governor Jerry Brown released a proposed 2018-19 budget that prioritizes building up reserves amid deep uncertainty about looming federal budget proposals, the impacts of the recently enacted federal tax bill, and future economic conditions. The Governor forecasts revenues that are $4.2 billion higher (over a three-year “budget window” from 2016-17 to 2018-19) than previously projected in the 2017-18 budget enacted last June, driven largely by continued economic growth. The Governor’s budget assumes no changes to current federal policies and funding levels and is not yet able to account for the potential impacts of the Republican tax bill passed in late December.

The Governor’s proposed budget reflects some notable advances, such as providing funding to fully implement the Local Control Funding Formula for K-12 education (designed to direct additional resources to disadvantaged students), continuing to invest in early education and higher education, and creating a home visiting pilot program that would offer a range of supports for families participating in welfare-to-work (CalWORKs). In addition, the proposal maintains resources to address the impact of federal actions targeting the state’s immigrant residents. Yet, the Governor also places a heavy emphasis on building California’s reserves. He proposes making a one-time supplemental deposit of $3.5 billion to the state’s rainy day fund, in addition to the $1.5 billion required by Proposition 2 (2014). This proposed $5.0 billion deposit would raise the rainy day fund balance to the Prop. 2 maximum of 10 percent of General Fund tax revenues.

Source: First Look: Budget Proposal Prioritizes Saving for a Rainy Day Amid Federal and Economic Uncertainties – California Budget & Policy Center

Vallejo trustees to appoint more members to committee – Times Herald

By John Glidden

The Vallejo school board is expected to name four additional members to the district’s Budget Advisory Committee on Wednesday.

Vallejo school district Superintendent Adam Clark is recommending the board appoint Ken Salas, Lynette Henley, Hazel Wilson, and Shawnee Blaylock.

The California School Employee Association and Vallejo Education Association will be represented by Salas and Henley, respectively.

Wilson is a former Vallejo City Unified School District Governing Board trustee and will represent the community while Blaylock is a parent/guardian member.

The four will join VCUSD Trustee Marianne Kearney-Brown, the district’s Chief Operations Officer Mitchell Romao, community members Allan Yeap and Ravi Shankar, Kimberly Mitchell-Lewis and Rosalind Hines of the Vallejo School Managers Association.

Source: Vallejo trustees to appoint more members to committee

Board backs $19M in work for Public Safety Academy – Daily Republic

By Ryan McCarthy

A plan that calls for $19 million in spending for a new library, gym and locker buildings at the Public Safety Academy won support Thursday from Fairfield-Suisun School District trustees.

School district staff had recommended approval for the agreement between the district and Landmark Construction in Placer County.

The Public Safety Academy opened in 2012 and has a higher attendance rate than other schools in the Fairfield-Suisun School District, few suspensions and “is doing very well,” according to a self-study for its accreditation.

Source: Board backs $19M in work for Public Safety Academy