“Dreamers” at community colleges urged to apply for financial aid – The Reporter

By Richard Bammer

State community college leaders are concerned about a dramatic drop in financial aid applications among undocumented students, due, in part perhaps, to the political climate in Washington, D.C., and the Trump White House.

But Eloy Ortiz Oakley, chancellor of California’s 113 community colleges, reminded that assistance is still available through the California Dream Act and urged eligible students to apply.

His announcement, in a press release issued in February, came several days after President Donald Trump broadened immigration enforcement policies, directing federal officials to find, arrest and deport those in the country illegally, regardless of whether they have committed serious crimes.

Source: “Dreamers” at community colleges urged to apply for financial aid

Can educators, business leaders bolster state’s workforce? – The Reporter

By Richard Bammer

Prominent educators and equally prominent members of business communities, it seems, are finally beginning to talk about preparing students for the 21st-century workplace, as local school district trustee have for many years.

On Wednesday, a Jelly Belly vice president spoke to some 40 AVID students at Armijo High in Fairfield, telling them what employers are looking for in a prospective employee.

On Friday, a revived K-12-community college committee met for the first time in Sacramento about how the two educational sectors can work together to help more Californians find success in the job market and strengthen the state’s workforce.

John Jamison, vice president of retail operations at Jelly Belly, the giant candymaker in Fairfield, generally spoke in broad terms about what employers seek in young people entering the labor force.

 

Bill would allow JCs – including SCC – to issue teaching credentials – Daily Republic

By Todd R. Hansen

Community colleges have long been a pathway to vocational goals – often the course chosen by those students who see no value in a four-year degree that has no useful purpose for their careers.

And while students who want to be teachers may attend a community college to kick off their academic lives, eventually tradition required they go to a university to get at least a bachelor’s degree and earn a credential.

A bill recently introduced by state Sen. Bill Dodd would allow community colleges, like Solano College, to develop their own teacher credentialing program.

Source: Bill would allow JCs – including SCC – to issue teaching credentials

4-year degree for about $10,000, Solano College professor tells business groups – Daily Republic

By Ryan McCarthy

Students at Solano Community College can get a four-year degree for about $10,000 in biomanufacturing and finish college without debt, professor Jim DeKloe said Thursday at a meeting of three local chambers of commerce.

Industrial biotechnology professor DeKloe recounted how Genentech said in 1994 it would open a Vacaville site and how the corporation has assisted Solano College.

“They have been a wonderful partner,” DeKloe said.

Source: 4-year degree for about $10,000, Solano College professor tells business groups

State department of education releases $100M in college-readiness grants – The Reporter

By Richard Bammer

For many California’s high school students, dreams of attending college are being nurtured by a state grant.

State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson on Wednesday announced that nearly 1,000 school districts, county offices of education, and charter schools, will receive about $100 million in grants to help students prepare to attend college.

The grants, which are available through the 2018–19 fiscal year, come from a $200 million College Readiness Block Grant program administered by the California Department of Education. The expenditure also was approved by Gov. Jerry Brown and the state Legislature.

The goal is to increase the number of students who enroll in college and complete a degree program in four years, with a special emphasis on helping English learners, low-income students, and foster youth.

 

Source: State department of education releases $100M in college-readiness grants

Educators, most voters support Proposition 55; taxpayer groups don’t – The Reporter

By Richard Bammer

Educators want it; local taxpayer groups don’t: Proposition 55, the Tax Extension to Fund Education and Healthcare initiative.

One 17 state initiatives on the crowded Nov. 8 ballot, it extends by 12 years the temporary personal income tax increases enacted in 2012 on earnings of more than $250,000. The money would be disbursed to K-12 schools, California community colleges, and, in certain years, to health-care programs.

The measure would essentially extend 2012’s Proposition 30, which sent billions of dollars to the state’s 1,000 school districts, among other funding recipients, including public safety.

Source: Educators, most voters support Proposition 55; taxpayer groups don’t – The Reporter

Wide swatch of voters support Proposition 51; anti-tax groups do not – The Reporter

By Richard Bammer

Many parents, including Vacaville Unified trustees, California educators, and state and federal legislators from both sides of the political aisle support Proposition 51, but, as expected, major statewide anti-tax groups do not.

If approved by voters Nov. 8, the K-12 School and Community College Facilities initiative, the first of its kind on a California ballot, authorizes $9 billion in general obligation bonds for new buildings and upgrades to the state’s 10,000 K-12 schools, including 1,100 charter schools, vocational education facilities, and the state’s 113 community colleges. California has some 6.2 million students in K-12 schools and some 2.1 million enrolled in community colleges, the largest such systems of their kind in the nation.

The initiative’s fiscal impact, according to the Legislative Analyst’s Office, would be about $17.6 billion to pay off the principal ($9 billion) and interest ($8.6 billion) on the bonds. It would generate payments of $500 million annually for 35 years.

 

Source: Wide swatch of voters support Proposition 51; anti-tax groups do not

Transition to College Marred by Remedial Need, Report Says – Education News

By Kristin DeCarr

A recently released report from the Community College Research Center examines the effectiveness of “transition courses” in use across the country to prepare students for college-level math and English coursework.

The report, “Improving the Transition to College: Estimating the Impact of High School Transition Courses on Short-Term College Outcomes,” discusses the recent use of “transition courses” by many states, districts, and individual high schools, which are implemented as a result of the increasing number of students who graduate high school unprepared for college coursework. These students typically enroll in remedial courses upon entering college, which are associated with lower progression and college completion rates.

Outcomes for the study were measured by observing which students did not have to enroll in remedial courses once they entered college as a result of receiving a passing score on a placement exam.

Source: Transition to College Marred by Remedial Need, Report Says

Friends of the Dixon May Fair offer college scholarships – The Reporter

The Friends of the Dixon May Fair will award a total of $12,500 in college scholarships to Solano County students enrolled in a California university or community college and who are majoring in agriculture or an agricultural-related field. The deadline to apply for the scholarships is 5 p.m., March 1. The Friends will award four scholarships for those enrolled in a four-year college, and three scholarships for those enrolled in a two-year college. Over the last 14 years, they’ve awarded $142,000 in college scholarships to Solano County students pursuing an agricultural-related career.

The top student in the four-year college category will receive the $3000 Ester Armstrong Memorial Scholarship, memorializing the former Dixon May Fair chief executive officer. Three other scholarships, at $2000 each, will be given in the four-year college category. For two-year college students, the awards are: the Jack Hopkins Memorial Scholarship of $1500; and two scholarships at $1,000 each.

via Friends of the Dixon May Fair offer college scholarships.

Two Bay Area community colleges to launch four-year degree programs – The Reporter

By Katy Murphy

Fifteen California community colleges, including two in the Bay Area, are poised to be the first in the state to offer low-cost bachelor’s degrees after a historic shift in California law.

 

 On Tuesday, Foothill College in Los Altos Hills and Skyline College in San Bruno received initial approval from the college system’s board of governors, along with 13 others recommended by the state chancellor’s office.

 

 “This is clearly about people having access to an education that will lead to jobs,” said Regina Stanback Stroud, president of Skyline College.

via Two Bay Area community colleges to launch four-year degree programs.

Obama proposes free community college | EdSource

By Michelle Maitre

President Barack Obama has unveiled a proposal to make the first two years of community college free for students who are diligent about working toward a degree.

“What I’d like to do is see the first two years of community college free for everybody who is willing to work for it,” Obama said Thursday in a Facebook video announcing the plan. “It’s something that we can accomplish and something that’ll train our workforce so that we can compete with anybody in the world.”

Under the plan, the federal government would contribute three-quarters of the average cost of community college, while participating states would contribute the rest, according to information on a White House blog. To qualify, students must maintain at least a 2.5 grade point average, attend college at least half-time and “make steady progress toward completing their degree.” States would have to opt-in to participate in the program.

via Obama proposes free community college | EdSource#.VLAL6WctHGg#.VLAL6WctHGg.

Solano College trustees to discuss new 4-year-degree law – Daily Republic

By Susan Winlow

Trustees at Solano Community College on Wednesday will discuss passage of a new law that will allow California community colleges to offer four-year degrees.

Gov. Jerry Brown signed Senate Bill 850, authored by Sen. Marty Block, D-San Diego, over the weekend as an answer to an estimated demand of more than 1 million four-year degrees by the year 2025. Currently only the University of California and California State University systems offer public four-year degrees. More than 20 states nationwide currently allow community colleges to offer four-year degrees.

via Solano College trustees to discuss new 4-year-degree law Daily Republic.

Local colleges pleased with funding in May budget draft plan – Vallejo Times Herald

By Sarah Rohrs

Following years of painful budget cuts, California is singing a different tune these days thanks to tax windfalls for state coffers, according to the governor’s office.

Gov. Jerry Brown’s draft spending plan, a prelude to summer talks and deliberations for a new budget, calls for record levels of spending, state offices announced.

The governor is projecting a $107.8 billion general fund to pay for day-to-day- operations — about $1 billion more than what he proposed earlier this year.

That figure represents a 24 percent increase over spending levels in the 2011-12 budget.

Brown’s draft plan also calls for $142 million to address a litany of problems related to the current drought, including firefighting, emergency response, water management, wildlife preservation and food assistance, according to wire reports.

via Local colleges pleased with funding in May budget draft plan – Vallejo Times Herald.

Dixon High hosting community college fair – Dixon Tribune | Facebook

By Brianna Boyd, Editor

Dixon High seniors who plan to enroll in a community college next fall will want to mark their calendars for a Community College Application Fair taking place at the high school later this month. The school will be hosting the fair on Feb. 28, from 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., in the library. College representatives and admission officers will be present from a number of area schools, including Solano Community College, Woodland Community College, Sacramento City College, Butte Community College and Napa Community College.

The fair is one of many new activities and events taking place at Dixon High this year to promote a college going culture. At the Community College Application Fair, students will be encouraged to apply for admission to one or more schools if they have not already done so.

via Dixon High hosting community college… – The Dixon Tribune | Facebook.

Brown projects big increase in school spending in next state budget | EdSource Today

By John Fensterwald and Kathryn Baron

With state revenues surging, Gov. Jerry Brown is proposing to raise K-12 spending in next year’s state budget a healthy $725 per student – 8.5 percent on average – and to use additional new dollars to wipe the last $6 billion of late payment to schools, known as deferrals, off the books.

Brown will highlight increases for education when he releases the 2014-15 budget this morning. Leaks of the document to the news media on Wednesday pushed up the scheduled release a day. (See here and here for reports on the overall General Fund budget.)

Proposition 98 spending in 2014-15 would be $14.3 billion or 30 percent more than three years ago but less than 9 percent above the pre-recession level of $56.6 billion. Source: Governor’s Budget Summary for 2014-15.

via Brown projects big increase in school spending in next state budget | EdSource Today.

LAO projects huge Prop. 98 increase for K-12, community colleges next year | EdSource Today

By John Fensterwald

From gloom to boom, how quickly things change. A resurgent economy and recalculations of revenue from the past two years will leave the state budget with a multi-billion-dollar surplus next year and K-12 schools and community colleges with unexpected billions more to spend, according to a projection that the Legislative Analyst’s Office released on Wednesday.

“The state’s budgetary condition is stronger than at any time in the past decade,” the LAO concluded in its 2014-15 Fiscal Outlook. “The state’s structural deficit – in which ongoing spending commitments were greater than projected revenues – is no more.”

via LAO projects huge Prop. 98 increase for K-12, community colleges next year | EdSource Today.

Career Tech Web Enhancements – Year 2013 (CA Dept of Education)

California students have new online help as they plan for careers and college, State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson announced today.

“The diversity of our global economy can provide many opportunities for students, but having so many choices can be challenging as well,” Torlakson said. “With new features on two really great Web sites, we’re working to give students the resources they need to plan their path to a successful future.”

via Career Tech Web Enhancements – Year 2013 (CA Dept of Education).

Solano College looks to bring international center to campus – Daily Republic

By Susan Winlow

Members of the Solano Community College governing board will consider a partnership Wednesday with a nonprofit organization that could help provide an English-language program at the college for non-native speakers.

Board members will review a memorandum of understanding between the district and the International Education Center, which “disseminates education, encourages exchanges in educational cultures and contributes to international collaboration in education,” according to staff reports.

via Solano College looks to bring international center to campus Daily Republic.

Dan Walters: California higher ed resistant to change – Sacramento Bee

By Dan Walters / dwalters@sacbee.com

College administrators and instructors – particularly those in public institutions – usually profess “progressive” ideological outlooks.

Oddly, however, they tend to be very conservative, even reactionary, in resisting operational changes. They revere traditional classes in traditional classrooms, calendars organized by semesters and quarters of instruction, lengthy recesses between those periods, curricula controlled by faculty senates – and, of course, tenure.

via Dan Walters: California higher ed resistant to change – Dan Walters – The Sacramento Bee.

Resistance greets pumped-up effort to streamline community college, CSU transfer | EdSource Today

By 

When a long-awaited and much-needed bill to streamline transfer from community colleges to California State University passed the state Legislature three years ago, it had sweeping support: unanimous approval among lawmakers and a list of backers more than 80 deep. All is not so harmonious for its younger sibling, Senate Bill 440, which would compel campuses to move faster to develop transfer degrees.

Despite a spate of amendments in recent weeks, including several just released Monday, prominent community college and CSU officials and organizations have voted to oppose the bill by Sen. Alex Padilla, D-Van Nuys, when it comes up for a hearing Tuesday in the Assembly Higher Education Committee.

via Resistance greets pumped-up effort to streamline community college, CSU transfer | EdSource Today.