Solano County Office of Education lands $50K grant to support math, science – The Reporter

By Richard Bammer

Some say “throwing money at schools” makes little or no difference in student achievement outcomes, but American educators generally would argue the exact opposite, asserting that money, indeed, can make a real difference and often does.

To that end, the Solano County Office of Education will use a recently received $50,000 grant to support K-5 math and science standards in area schools.

“We are excited and look forward to working with our school districts to develop model math and science lessons that are engaging and aligned with math and science standards,” Lisette Estrella-Henderson, superintendent of county schools, said in a press release about the County Implementation Award Program (CIAP). “We look forward to supporting our educators who work so hard on behalf of the students they serve.”

 

Source: Solano County Office of Education lands $50K grant to support math, science

SCOE receives grant to support math, science – Daily Republic

By Daily Republic Staff

The Solano County Office of Education received a $50,000 grant from the County Implementation Award Program (CIAP) to support K-5 math and science standards implementation, according to a press release.

“We are excited and look forward to working with our school districts to develop model math and science lessons that are engaging and aligned with math and science standards,” said Solano County Superintendent of Schools Lisette Estrella-Henderson in a statement. “We look forward to supporting our educators who work so hard on behalf of the students they serve.”

A pilot team of K-5 teachers from participating school districts will collaborate to develop model lessons that will be available to all teachers by December 2018. The team will engage in a process of developing, pilot-testing, and refining these lessons in their classrooms.

Source: SCOE receives grant to support math, science

Women’s History Month is a Great Time to Honor Women Mathematicians – Daily Republic

By Deanna Hurn

If you post on Facebook, search on Google or write using Microsoft Word, you can thank a woman.

Because I’m an educator, mathematician and Mom to three wonderful girls, I’m committed to spreading the word about women pioneers in the field of Mathematics. In the mid-1800s, Mathematician Ada Lovelace made calculations of rational numbers in what is now known as the first computer program. Who knew?

Lovelace is one of many women mathematicians we should appreciate all year long, not just during Women’s History Month. Thanks to last year’s excellent film, “Hidden Figures,” we know the story of Katherine Johnson, one of three African-American math whizzes essential to launching astronaut John Glenn into orbit around the earth in 1962.

Source: Teacher News: Women’s History Month is a Great Time to Honor Women Mathematicians

New home for math at Vaca High – The Reporter

By Richard Bammer

It was a mammoth and desired present ready to use after the Christmas holidays.

Vacaville High School students, teachers, support staff and administrators ushered in the new year with a newly built $9 million, 15-classroom mathematics building, part of Vacaville Unified’s continuing districtwide campus upgrades under Measure A.

The two-story structure, which opened Monday when classes resumed, further enhances the West Monte Vista school — one of the district’s oldest at 66 years — coming five months after completion of the campus’ new and similar English building.

Source: New home for math at Vaca High

Academic Decathlon organizers seek volunteers – Daily Republic

By Daily Republic Staff

A variety of volunteer positions await adults who want to help at the North Bay Region Academic Decathlon Jan. 27 and Feb. 3 at Solano Community College, 4000 Suisun Valley Road.

The Academic Decathlon is a competitive event modeled after the Olympics to stimulate academic achievement and honor “athletes of the mind.” The competition among high school students centers on art, music, literature, mathematics, economics, science and social science.

A list of volunteer jobs, and a volunteer form, can be found at NBRAD Application.

For more information, send an email to Ken Scarberry at kscarberry@solanocoe.net or call 646-7601.

 

Source: Academic Decathlon organizers seek volunteers

MathWorks Is The New Sponsor Of High School Math Modeling Competition – Forbes

By Alex Knapp

The Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) announced today that it has found a sponsor for its annual math modeling competition. Boston-based MathWorks, which creates software such as MATLAB and Simulink. The competition has been newly-named the MathWorks Math Modeling (M3) Challenge, and the three-day competition will begin on March 2 of next year.

The terms of the sponsorship haven’t been made public, but last summer, SIAM had stated it was looking for a commitment of at least 3 years for $1.2 million annually.

“We see this opportunity to support SIAM as another step in our efforts to motivate and inspire young students to consider and pursue STEM careers,” Lauren Tabolinsky, MathWorks’ academic program manager, said in a statement.

Source: MathWorks Is The New Sponsor Of High School Math Modeling Competition

Math festivals help elementary students — and their families — see math as fun | EdSource

By Ashley Hopkinson

A dozen parents gathered around veteran math educator Leanna Baker, moments before students show up for what is billed as a math “festival” for students at Allendale Elementary School in Oakland.

“Do your best not to give them an answer,” Baker told the dozen parent volunteers about how best to help the transitional kindergarten to fifth grade students participating in math activities arranged for that day. “We want them to be problem solvers.”

Interviews by EdSource with educators at several school districts suggests that a growing number of elementary schools are hosting events like these for students and families to convey the message that math is fun and can be practiced every day in simple ways in their own lives, not just in the classroom.

Source: Math festivals help elementary students — and their families — see math as fun | EdSource

Brown signs bill to help boost community college student achievement – Daily Republic

By Daily Republic Staff

Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill into law Thursday that allows more community college students to bypass remedial English and math courses and begin directly in college-level math and English, according to a press release.

Nearly 170,000 California community college students enter remedial math, for example, with as many as 110,000 failing to complete the math requirements required for a degree, according to the release.

Assembly Bill 705 will require colleges to use the high school grades or students rather than standardized tests to make accurate and equitable placement decisions, and ensure students are placed into courses that give them the best chances of completing college-level courses within a year.

Source: Brown signs bill to help boost community college student achievement

New Professional Learning Support Director – Year 2017 (CA Dept of Education)

State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson announced that he has appointed Barbara Murchison as Director of the California Department of Education (CDE) Professional Learning Support Division.

Murchison will oversee the division’s efforts to support educators throughout their professional career, from recruitment to leadership opportunities. This division works in collaboration across the Department and the state, helping educators implement the California Standards and curriculum frameworks.

It administers several professional learning programs for educators at all levels and in all content areas, including science, technology, engineering, math, history-social science, literacy, and arts, with the goal of ensuring equitable learning opportunities for the state’s most vulnerable students, including English learners.

Murchison most recently served as the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) State Lead, where she helped create a plan that meets federal requirements while shifting away from top-down decision-making and toward local control that helps local school districts better meet their own needs. The plan was developed over 18 months with input from thousands of Californians.

Source: New Professional Learning Support Director – Year 2017 (CA Dept of Education)

BUSD to tackle state test data at Thursday’s school board meeting – Benicia Herald

By Nick Sestanovich

The school board will hear a report and discussion on the data from the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC) at Thursday’s meeting.

The SBAC is a statewide assessment administered to all third through eighth-graders and 11th-graders in the areas of English Language Arts (ELA) and Mathematics. The SBAC replaced the California Standards test following the state’s shift to Common Core standards and allow students to not only answer questions in a variety of formats but also require students to explain their answers in an effort to demonstrate their knowledge. It also utilizes a computer whereas the previous test used the traditional pencil and paper.

Assistant Superintendent Dr. Leslie Beatson and Educational Services Coordinator Stephanie Rice will dive into the findings from the results at Thursday’s meeting.

Source: BUSD to tackle state test data at Thursday’s school board meeting

California delays release of Smarter Balanced scores | EdSource

By John Fensterwald

The California Department of Education has postponed the release of statewide results of the Smarter Balanced assessments in math and reading, which were to be published on Tuesday.

The department announced the delay Friday, citing a “recently identified data issue.” It offered no more details and did not set a new date for the release. The department had said the results would be released in September, then earlier this month pushed the date up to Aug. 29. Last year, the department released the scores on Aug. 24. In 2015, the first year of the full test, scores were released on Sept. 9.

School districts have had access to their own results for several weeks. And many parents already have received a report on their children’s individual scores, with a comparison with last year’s results.

Source: California delays release of Smarter Balanced scores | EdSource

Cal State drops intermediate algebra as requirement to take some college-level math courses | EdSource

By Mikhail Zinshteyn

A new policy from the California State University system will soon allow some students to take math classes with pre-requisites other than intermediate algebra to satisfy the math requirements they need for graduation.

The new rules go into effect starting in the fall of 2018 and will apply to both CSU freshmen and community college students transferring into the 23-university system. The changes will permit students who are not pursuing math or science majors to take non-algebra based math courses for general education, such as statistics, personal finance or even game theory and computer science.

Source: Cal State drops intermediate algebra as requirement to take some college-level math courses | EdSource

Summer and school year programs give the very lowest math achievers answers, and hope | EdSource

By Carolyn Jones

Cesar Conriquez, 12, was doing OK in math until 4th grade, when the curriculum turned to division. He got stuck. Really stuck. As his class moved on to more complex mathematical equations, Cesar was increasingly mired in confusion, and his grades in 4th and 5th grade plummeted.

“My teacher was helping me out but I still didn’t get it. Fractions, whole numbers … I couldn’t do it. It was stressing me out,” said the Pittsburg youth. “I wasn’t happy with my report card and my parents weren’t either. So I asked if I could get extra help.”

His parents enrolled him in Pittsburg Unified’s Summer Math Institute, a free, five-week intensive math program for middle-school students of all abilities, with special classes for students whose math skills are several grades below where they should be.

Source: Summer and school year programs give the very lowest math achievers answers, and hope | EdSource

Transitional kindergarten boosts school readiness in math, reading | EdSource

By Ashley Hopkinson

California students who attended transitional kindergarten were more engaged in the learning process and better prepared for math and reading when they entered kindergarten than children who did not, according to a new study by the American Institutes for Research.

The study, released Wednesday, compared the skill levels of kindergartners who had attended transitional kindergarten with those who had attended preschool or had not been in formal preschool the year prior.

“Transitional kindergarten gives students an advantage of three to six months of learning in literacy and mathematics skills at kindergarten entry, which is quite notable, especially given that a large majority of the students attended preschool,” said Heather Quick, principal researcher of the study.

Source: Transitional kindergarten boosts school readiness in math, reading | EdSource

Trustees OK hotel, Great America, Mary’s Pizza Shack costs – Daily Republic

By Ryan McCarthy

Hotels stays costing $2,926, tickets to Great America totaling $2,502 and catering for a Crystal Middle School event have won Fairfield-Suisun School District trustees’ approval.

Mary’s Pizza Shack in Fairfield catered the Gifted and Talented Education event for more than 200 students and family members. The catering cost $1,231.

The Great America trip was for an eighth-grade class trip at the Sheldon Academy of Innovative Learning.

Source: Trustees OK hotel, Great America, Mary’s Pizza Shack costs

Torlakson Kicks Off 2016 STEM Symposium – Year 2016 (CA Dept of Education)

State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson today kicked off California’s largest Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) education symposium.

Torlakson, who started his public service career as a high school science teacher and coach, welcomed more than 3,000 teachers, parents, students, researchers, entrepreneurs and others to the two-day event at the Anaheim Convention Center.

“STEM education is a key pathway to success in 21st century careers and college, especially in the high-tech, international economy,” Torlakson said. “We want all of our students to get excited about STEM learning, dream big, and reach for the stars.”

The third annual event showcases the importance of STEM education. Speakers highlighted California’s Next Generation Science Standards, a revolutionary update in teaching California’s 6.2 million public school students about science.

Source: Torlakson Kicks Off 2016 STEM Symposium – Year 2016 (CA Dept of Education)

Fairfield-Suisun School District STEM camp helps dreams take flight – Daily Republic

By Bill Hicks

With graduation season in the rear view mirror, the school year for the Fairfield-Suisun School District is over – but that doesn’t mean the learning has stopped.

A group of 40 sixth- and seventh-graders returned, Friday night, from a five-day Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics camp, which included a trip to Vacaville-based ICON Aircraft, the Senate and Assembly chambers at the State Capitol and culminated with a trip to Vandenberg Air Force Base outside of Lompoc in Southern California.

This was the inaugural year for the program, which was developed in part thanks to a pre-existing connection Superintendent Kris Corey had with staff at Vandenberg AFB.

Source: Fairfield-Suisun School District STEM camp helps dreams take flight

Number of new math and science teachers declining in California | EdSource

By Pat Maio

Posing an ongoing challenge for California educators trying to tackle a critical teacher shortage area, the number of credentials issued to new math and science teachers in California continues to decline, according to new figures released Monday by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing.

In the 2014-15 school year, a total of 1,119 math credentials were issued, down 8.4 percent from the 1,221 in the previous school year. For that same year, there were 1,347 science credentials issued, down 6 percent from the 1,434 issued the year before.

The figures underscore the difficulty California still faces in addressing the longstanding shortage of math and science teachers in the state, a problem other states are also grappling with.

Source: Number of new math and science teachers declining in California | EdSource

Students can satisfy college math requirement while in high school | EdSource

By Nadra Nittle

Alyssa Wallace, a senior at Long Beach Polytechnic High School, was among the 29 high school students who took an unusual math class last summer; the course, taught at Cal State Long Beach, will allow her to get her college degree without taking another math class once she enrolls at the campus.

Math 103 is the only class offered at a CSU campus designed for high school students to earn college credit, say its organizers and CSU officials. It also aims to attract would-be teachers.

The course is part of an effort to address a major obstacle that has sabotaged the academic plans of numerous California students – satisfying college math requirements.

The three-week class, which kicked off last summer, allows high school juniors and seniors in the Long Beach Unified School District to earn three university credits.

Unlike Advanced Placement classes, Math 103 isn’t targeted at exceptional math students. Instead, the class is open to any student in 11th or 12th grade who’s passed Algebra II.

via Students can satisfy college math requirement while in high school | EdSource.

House Set To Vote On Education Overhaul : NPR Ed

By Claudio Sanchez and Anya Kamenetz

Its almost a decade overdue, but the U.S. House of Representatives is scheduled to vote later today on a bill to replace the No Child Left Behind law.

Since NCLB was signed by President George W. Bush in early 2002, the federal government has played a major role in telling states how to run — and reform — their schools. But this new bill signals a sea change in the federal approach.

Annual tests in math and reading, the centerpiece of the old law, would remain in place. But the consequences of those test scores would no longer be dictated by the federal government. The new law, known as the Every Student Succeeds Act, significantly shifts responsibility for improving schools back to the states.

via House Set To Vote On Education Overhaul : NPR Ed : NPR.