Trustees hear detailed update on career tech ed – The Reporter

By Richard Bammer

Decades ago in U.S. high schools, it was called “voc ed,” for vocational education, perhaps best exemplified by auto shop and wood shop classes for boys who were largely disinterested in college and perhaps disinterested in behaving well in traditional classrooms, too, the programs serving sometimes as a catch-all for boys deemed discipline programs, their GPAs hovering at 2.0 and lower.

But in recent years high school voc ed has morphed into “career technical education,” or CTE for short, and it is a lot more complex these days, specifically in its scope, offerings and goals, as explained by Mark Frazier, Vacaville Unified’s chief academic officer.

CTE is a program that mixes traditional academic subjects and knowledge with technical and job-related know-how, giving students a way to succeed in college or in a post-high school career.

 

Source: Trustees hear detailed update on career tech ed

New Career & College Transition Division Director – Year 2016 (CA Dept of Education)

State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson announced today the appointment of Donna Wyatt as the new Career and College Transition Division Director at the California Department of Education (CDE). She began her assignment September 6.

“Donna has devoted her professional career to helping students identify their passions and professional callings and providing those students the skills and direction needed to succeed,” Torlakson said. “She will be a tremendous resource for all of our schools. I couldn’t be more thrilled to have her join us in this important role.”

A long-time educator, Wyatt has more than 25 years of experience teaching, developing, and administering Career Technical Education (CTE) programs. Since July 2011, she has worked as the manager of Curriculum and Instruction Career Technical Education (CTE) for the Oakland Unified School District’s Linked Learning office, working with teachers to create CTE curriculum and build out career pathway courses that help connect students with internships and mentorships in a wide variety of fields such as engineering, manufacturing, and media arts.

Source: New Career & College Transition Division Director – Year 2016 (CA Dept of Education)

Career tech ed on VUSD agenda tonight – The Reporter

By Richard Bammer

Vacaville Unified leaders, when they meet tonight, will hear an update on the district’s Career Technical Education program.

Mark Frazier, the district’s chief academic officer, and several high school principals, including Mike Sullivan of Country, Mike Boles of Buckingham Charter, Ed Santopadre of Vacaville, and Adam Rich of Will C. Wood, will speak to the seven-member governing board about a variety of topics. They range from career pathways, pathways being considered, and the CTE Incentive Grant, among other things.

Career Technical Education is a program that mixes traditional academic subjects and knowledge with technical and job-related know-how, giving students a way to succeed in college or in a post-high school career.

The speakers will tell trustees about collaboration with area businesses and industries, community organizations, Solano Community College, and the Vacaville Chamber of Commerce.

Source: Career tech ed on VUSD agenda tonight – The Reporter

 

Bill to Reauthorize Career and Technical Education Law Passed by U.S. House – Education Week

By Andrew Ujifusa

The House of Representatives voted to approve a reauthorization of the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act on Tuesday, after the House education committee unanimously backed the bill earlier this year.

The Perkins Act has not been reauthorized since 2006, but the proposed reauthorization, the Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act, makes several notable changes to existing law. Among them are:

  • There’s a new definition of which students can be classified as “concentrators” in career and technical education. The bill defines a concentrator as a secondary student who has “completed three or more career and technical education courses, or completed at least two courses in [a] single career and technical education program or program of study.”
  • States would be able to withhold a greater share of their federal CTE funding under Perkins for their own competitive grants or formulas.
  • A new grant program, overseen by the education secretary, would award money to programs that align CTE with states’ workforce needs.
  • Schools are supposed to get less paperwork dumped on them when it comes to CTE.

Source: Bill to Reauthorize Career and Technical Education Law Passed by U.S. House – Politics K-12 – Education Week

Ed Dept Offers Guidelines on Gender Equity in Career/Tech Ed – Education News

By Raymond Scott

The U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights (OCR) and Office of Adult, Career, and Technical Education have released a letter saying that all students, regardless of their sex, must have equal access to the full range of career and technical programs offered. The letter is part of the White House’s United State of Women Summit.

“As the father of two daughters, I want my girls – and all young women in this country – to have access to the careers of their dreams, no matter the path,” said U.S. Secretary of Education John B. King Jr. “Career and technical education is not just about preparing some students for successful lives and careers, it’s about giving all students the tools to succeed.”

The letter makes clear that the Carl D. Perkins Career and technical Education Act requires states to meet their targets for participation and completion rates of males and females in programs that are nontraditional for their sex. Disparities in expertise and employment persist in certain fields.

Source: Ed Dept Offers Guidelines on Gender Equity in Career/Tech Ed

$100,000 Career Technical Education Grant – Year 2016 (CA Dept of Education)

State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson announced today that the California Department of Education (CDE) has received a $100,000 grant to develop a career readiness action plan and expand job opportunities for California students.

California is one of 24 states and the District of Columbia that won “New Skills for Youth” grants, part of a $75 million, five-year initiative developed by global financial services firm JPMorgan Chase. The effort includes a partnership with the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) and Advance CTE, a national nonprofit that represents Career Technical Education (CTE) leaders in states.

The grants will increase career-focused education, starting in high school and ending with postsecondary degrees or professional credentials focused on the skills that modern industries need.

“We are pleased to receive this grant because it will allow us to do additional analysis and planning in career technical education,” Torlakson said. “Improving and expanding career technical education is a top priority because these programs engage students and communities in so many different ways. They provide students with hands-on learning opportunities, internships, and mentorships with business leaders, and create pathways to 21st Century careers.”

Source: $100,000 Career Technical Education Grant – Year 2016 (CA Dept of Education)

State awards $245 million in career technical education grants | EdSource

By Theresa Harrington

More than 250 California schools, districts and other educational agencies will split $245 million in grants for career technical education and professional training approved Wednesday by the State Board of Education.

“California’s Career Technical Education leads the way in providing our students with a rigorous academic education in addition to the practical job skills that are in the greatest demand,” said Tom Torlakson, State Superintendent of Public Instruction, in a prepared statement. “At the same time, we’re providing businesses and our communities with a next-generation workforce needed to keep our economy thriving.”

The grants – ranging from $28,562 for Southern Trinity Joint Unified to $32.5 million for Los Angeles Unified – were awarded through the state’s Career Technical Education Incentive Grant program. The 265 agencies receiving the grants include schools, districts, charter schools, Regional Occupational Centers and Programs, or groups of schools and districts that often partner with nonprofits and businesses. In January, the state awarded $91 million in similar grants to 100 applicants.

Source: State awards $245 million in career technical education grants | EdSource

$1.5 billion helping career pathways take off in California’s high schools | EdSource

By Fermin Leal

Tenth-grader Ryan Streckfus glanced over the gauges on the control panel as he carefully lifted the steering wheel, hoping to keep his aircraft from stalling in the sky over the Long Beach harbor.

“Heading is now 150. Elevation is climbing back up to 3,000 feet. I’m back in control,” he said, from a flight simulator inside the aviation career pathway at Canyon High School in Anaheim where he’s training to become a pilot.

The program, the only one of its kind in the state, is part of a career technical education boom across California. As record numbers of high school students are applying to state colleges and universities, more are also receiving hands-on training in high-demand technical careers even before they earn their diplomas. The students, many beginning in the 9th grade, are in career pathways learning job skills alongside professionals in fields including aviation, health care, civil engineering, fashion design, tourism and new media.

via $1.5 billion helping career pathways take off in California’s high schools | EdSource.

Career and technical education must be integrated with academic coursework | EdSource

By Gary Hoachlander and Christopher J. Steinhauser

Young people growing up in California will face stiff competition for jobs when they enter the workforce. Lasting success in the rapidly changing world of work requires ever increasing levels of proficiency with technical knowledge and skills. And the future prosperity of our state depends on a highly skilled workforce able to compete with the rest of the world.

Fortunately, career and technical education – once called vocational education – is enjoying a resurgence of interest and support in California, with an additional $900 million included in this year’s state budget. Just two weeks ago, the superintendent of public instruction gave school districts until Nov. 30, 2015 to apply for grants to develop and enhance high-quality career technical education programs.

via Career and technical education must be integrated with academic coursework | EdSource.

College and Career Readiness: An EdSource/CTA survey of teachers | EdSource

By EdSource Staff

This survey by EdSource, in partnership with the California Teachers Association (CTA), provides new insights into teacher attitudes toward preparing students for college and careers, a principal goal of all major education reforms being implemented in California, including the Common Core State Standards.

Of the 1,000 teachers surveyed, 95 percent support setting college and career readiness as the goal for the state’s students. The teachers surveyed also said they felt critical thinking skills are a more important indicator of college readiness than standardized test scores.

But while indicating a high level of support for the Common Core standards, teachers also expressed a need for a clearer definition of what constitutes “college and career readiness” and for greater professional development to support these goals. The survey also found that teachers’ confidence in the attainability of the career and college readiness goals varied based on the socioeconomic background of their students.

via College and Career Readiness: An EdSource/CTA survey of teachers | EdSource.

Career Readiness: Starting Early with Young Learners | Edutopia

By Heather Wolpert-Gawron

We hear a lot of talk about career readiness these days, and for secondary educators, you cant spit without finding advice on how to make our units, our school structure, or our content more aligned with prepping our students for the jobs of today and the future. So how about kindergarteners?

Dont laugh. Im not writing today to advocate that we get our early learners to decide now on a career in dentistry or accounting. Im here today to write about the skills that successful people have in any career — skills that should be encouraged early on.

So I reached out to a friend of mine that has some authority in career readiness to talk about ways to scaffold the skills our students need to know.

via Career Readiness: Starting Early with Young Learners | Edutopia.

Career Pathways Trust allowing students to explore the universe | EdSource

By Fermin Leal

Eight high school students are spending the summer helping scientists at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory study dwarf planets, design future Mars missions, observe Earth’s climate change and even look for extraterrestrial life.

The students from Santa Ana Unified School District belong to a prestigious eight-week internship at the Jet Propulsion Lab in Pasadena, allowing them to work alongside some of the nation’s top engineers, analysts and scientists.

The internship was created this summer as part of California’s Career Pathways Trust, the nearly $500 million effort aimed at promoting partnerships between schools, community colleges, business and institutes to prepare students for real-world jobs.

via Career Pathways Trust allowing students to explore the universe | EdSource.

Career guidance helps students figure out their paths | EdSource

By Michelle Maitre

San Diego high school student Sharon Tamir is spending four weeks of her junior year in Vancouver, Canada, interning at an historic school for girls and delving into the teaching practices surrounding project-based learning.

Her classmate Dayyan Sisson is spending his internship month at Birch Aquarium at UC San Diego’s Scripps Institute of Oceanography. Dayyan will intern as a biotechnology researcher, studying the prehensile tails of seahorses, sea dragons and pipefish to discover lessons that can be derived from the creatures’ natural biology and applied to technological advances in the human sphere. Think advances to fine-tune robotic tentacles used by underwater sea rovers or improve the design of stents, the thin tubes used in medical procedures.

via Career guidance helps students figure out their paths | EdSource#.VWX7_GfbLGg#.VWX7_GfbLGg.

Vallejo’s Mare Island Technology Academy in running for several awards – Times Herald

By Times-Herald staff

Mare Island Technology Academy, along with its sister school MIT Academy High School, have been notified by the California State Department of Education that they will be receiving multiple school walk-throughs after qualifying for the new Gold Ribbon/California Distinguished Schools program, according to an MITA press release.

According to MITA officials, the new California Gold Ribbon Award, implemented this year under the direction of State Superintendent Tom Torlakson, was inaugurated this year to succeed the previous California Distinguished School program. As part of the Gold Ribbon selection process, a new category has been added, the California Career Technical Education Exemplary School award. As technology-based schools, both MIT middle and high schools are also candidates for the CTE awards, which means the combined schools are in the running for a total of four distinguished school awards – two each for the Gold Ribbon and CTE awards.

via Vallejo’s Mare Island Technology Academy in running for several awards.

Governor proposes boost for career education | EdSource

By Michelle Maitre

Career education is projected to receive a boost under Gov. Jerry Brown’s proposed budget, part of a larger push for workforce development training in California.

The governor’s budget proposal for 2015-16 includes $876 million for career technical education and other job training initiatives at K-12 schools and community colleges – welcome news for programs that saw course offerings cut and enrollments decrease over the past several years.

The governor identifies the programs as a key part of a larger, $1.2 billion statewide effort aimed at “reinvesting and reshaping California’s workforce preparation systems.” The effort aims to get students into training programs that are more closely linked to regional workforce needs and to better coordinate job training programs at colleges and schools.

via Governor proposes boost for career education | EdSource#.VMqIqWctHGg#.VMqIqWctHGg.

Budget, new career-tech classes on Travis school board agenda tonight – The Reporter

By Richard Bammer

Annual board elections, approval of new course offerings, and the 2014-15 first interim budget report are on the agenda when Travis Unified leaders meet tonight in open session in Fairfield.

Trustees will elect a new board president or may choose to retain current president Ivery Hood. The other members are Angela Weinziner, John Dickerson and Riitta De Anda. A fifth seat, representing Travis Air Force Base, remains vacant, pending a special election in March.

Jim Bryan, assistant superintendent for educational services, will report on four new courses and the name change of another.

via Budget, new career-tech classes on Travis school board agenda tonight.

Sacramento’s schizophrenic love affair with Career Technical Education | EdSource Today

By Fred Jones

Californians have never seen more systemic reforms of how schools are financed, assessed and held accountable than in the three years since Governor Brown took office. The State Board of Education, the State Department of Education and the Community College Chancellor’s Office officials are scrambling to implement these sweeping statutory and budgetary changes, with anxious districts and stakeholder groups gearing up to meet the new challenges and opportunities.

Despite all of the hoopla surrounding these dramatic changes, one thing remains constant: Sacramento’s schizophrenic love affair with Career Technical Education.

On the one hand, nearly every elected official in Sacramento has publicly declared their deep and abiding love for CTE. Some have even hailed it as a silver bullet for broader concerns of dropouts and social injustices.

via Sacramento’s schizophrenic love affair with Career Technical Education | EdSource Today.

Students learn entry level job skills – Daily Republic

By Barry Eberling

A new program offers high school students the chance to learn the business skills that Solano County employers seek.

It’s called Solano County Work-Ready! Certification. Students take a three-week, after-school workshop – they need to have perfect attendance – and go through a review panel. Those who qualify get a certificate that they can use to help find a job.

The certificate is kind of a seal-of-approval, a sign that the holder knows the traits of a good employee.

via Students learn entry level job skills Daily Republic.

Career technical education counts in Solano – Daily Republic

By Ryan McCarthy

Where, asked Arthur Schwartz, did I learn the skills to go out and find a job?

The senior vice president and chief human resource officer for Travis Credit Union told members of the Countywide Career Technical Advisory Committee that he doesn’t recall precisely but knows the need for such skills among job seekers.

“I can give you a lot of horror stories,” he said.

via Career technical education counts in Solano Daily Republic.

What would federal shutdown mean for California education? | EdSource Today

By Jane Meredith Adams

Federal money for education will continue to flow into California, with some caveats, even with a government shutdown.

The big-ticket federal education programs in California – $1.8 billion a year for low-performing schools and $1.4 billion a year for special education – will be unscathed, according to a memorandum from the U.S. Department of Education. Those programs, along with grants for Career and Technical Education, would be deemed “a necessary exception” to a spending halt and would receive their scheduled Oct. 1 funding distribution, the federal department said.

via What would federal shutdown mean for California education? | EdSource Today.